Tag Archives: Hole-in-the-Rock Road

January 29, 2018 Peek-a-Boo Gulch, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah.

Video: Hiking Utah’s Slot Canyons Peek-A-Boo and Spooky Gulch

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By Michael Lanza

Send four kids age 10 to 12 through a tight slot canyon where they have to pull themselves over short pour-offs, duck through natural arches, and twist and contort their bodies to squeeze between wildly curved walls that frequently narrow to just inches wide, and they hardly stop gushing about it. “Wow, this is so cool!” “That’s amazing!” “Awesome!” We heard a lot of that when my friend Justin Hayes and I hiked Peek-a-Boo Gulch and Spooky Gulch in southern Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument with our kids. Watch this video and you’ll see why. Continue reading →

October 3, 2016 Above Crack-in-the-Wall, Coyote Gulch

Photo Gallery: Hiking and Backpacking Utah’s Wild Escalante

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By Michael Lanza

Explore slot canyons so narrow you have to take off your daypack and turn sideways to squeeze through. Dayhike to a waterfall that pours 126 feet over a multi-colored cliff into a perfect swimming hole. Backpack one of southern Utah’s most achingly gorgeous and family-friendly canyons. And that merely scrapes the surface of this weeklong adventure in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. The photo gallery below offers a peek behind the curtain of this less-busy corner of the Southwest’s canyonlands.

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November 5, 2015 Above Crack-in-the-Wall, Coyote Gulch, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah.

Great Trip: Backpacking Coyote Gulch in Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

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By Michael Lanza

Whether you’re an expert desert backpacker, taking a first multi-day hike in the Southwest canyon country, or heading out with your family, the three-day hike of Coyote Gulch has everything you’d want in a canyon trip: soaring, redrock canyon walls that go for miles, surprisingly lush greenery, a year-round creek that saves you from having to carry a lot of water, and relatively easy hiking. Little wonder that this tributary canyon of the Escalante River, in southern Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, has earned a reputation as a classic. Continue reading →

September 25, 2013 Jacob Hamblin Arch, Coyote Gulch, Utah.

Photo Gallery: Backpacking Utah’s Coyote Gulch

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With soaring, redrock canyon walls that go for miles, surprisingly lush greenery, a year-round creek that saves you from having to carry a lot of water, and relatively easy hiking, it’s little wonder that Coyote Gulch in southern Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument has become a classic two- to three-day backpacking trip, and popular with families. Fall and spring are the best times to hike it. Check out this gallery of photos for inspiration. Then read my story about a weeklong family trip spent backpacking Coyote Gulch as well as dayhiking in Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef National Parks, with more photos, a video, and info for planning your trip there.

 

April 18, 2013 Above Crack-in-the-Wall, Coyote Gulch, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

Playing the Memory Game in Southern Utah’s Escalante, Capitol Reef, and Bryce Canyon

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By Michael Lanza

Below a deep gash in a 50-foot-tall cliff of golden sandstone, shaded from the low, late-afternoon sun of early spring, I scramble up a steep slab using in-cut holds carved into the soft rock. Ten or 12 feet off the ground, I pull myself over the lip of a ledge to peer into a narrow cut in the earth, a hidden geologic oddity that lures in a certain type of hiker for one reason: because it’s barely wide enough for humans to squeeze through. And I have to smile.

I’m grinning first of all because I’ve found just what we had hoped to see. Water sometimes pools in a couple of potholes near the mouth of this slot canyon, and the air temperature today feels a little too cool to soak ourselves in cold water. Today, though, the sandy-bottomed, giant stone teacups are dry. But secondly, touching me on a more personal level, this canyon’s entrance looks much as I remember it from the first time I hiked through here, 16 years ago this month.

In less than two hours, my impression of this place will be almost completely remade. Continue reading →