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Gear Review: Salomon Conquest GTX Boots

Salomon Conquest GTX

Salomon Conquest GTX

Boots
Salomon Conquest GTX
$180, 2 lbs. 7 oz. (men’s 9)
Sizes: men’s 7-12, 13, women’s 5-10
salomon.com

Recovering from a deep bone bruise on the top of my left foot (suffered in a leader fall rock climbing a month earlier), I was hiking again for the first time when I wore these boots on a three-day backpacking trip to the Big Boulder Lakes in Idaho’s White Clouds Mountains. Hiking with my 12-year-old son, I carried up to 35 pounds for about 22 miles, with nearly 5,000 feet of uphill and downhill and significant sections of the route off-trail or on rough, user trails. I wanted a boot with a little more support and rigidity than most competitors in this midweight category, and the Conquest GTX delivered on that count.

Salomon Conquest GTX1The reasons: greater torsional rigidity than many models of similar weight, a firm heel cup with ample cushioning under the heel, and an above-the-ankle cut. The molded EVA midsole also felt very soft underfoot, and there’s abundant padding in the tongue and encasing the ankle. The fit is close in the heel through the midfoot for medium-volume feet, with plenty of wiggle room for toes—probably not for people with narrow feet. The split-suede uppers, a rubber toecap, and a perimeter mudguard armor the boots against abuse—they show no wear from miles of off-trail hiking, including steep scree. The Gore-Tex membrane never leaked, even when I stood in shallow creeks to test it, and it breathes well enough to prevent my feet from overheating on warm afternoons; they’re basically as breathable as many Gore-Tex boots in this category.

My one complaint: While the deep, widely spaced outsole lugs give good traction on most surfaces—including packed dirt, mud, and side-hilling steep, vegetated, off-trail slopes—they do not stick very well when scrambling rocky terrain.

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—Michael Lanza

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About The Author

Michael Lanza

A former field editor and primary gear reviewer for Backpacker Magazine, Michael Lanza created The Big Outside to share stories and images from his many backpacking, hiking, and other outdoor adventures, as well as expert tips and gear reviews to help readers plan and pull off their own great adventures.

5 Comments

  1. Avatar

    So far I love these boots! I’m a woman w/ a painful foot condition called Morton’s Neuroma (caused by climbing/hiking/age/flat foot) and I have to be extremely careful with boots. These offer good support, wide toe box to reduce nerve pain, and not too heavy. Have used only twice but have found they allowed me to hike pain free for longer distances. Finally!

    Reply
    • michaellanza

      Thanks for sharing that, Vicky, I’m glad the boots have worked out for you.

      Reply
  2. Avatar

    Hi! I will do a trekking for 4 days on Gunung Rinjani in Indonesia, and I’m not sure about what boots I should wear. I was thinking on buying the Salomon Conquest GTX for women, but you say they are not good enough for rocks, and the trekking has stones on it’s way.

    I detailed the trekking in order to give you useful information for give me a good advice for what kind of boot I should buy:

    Day 01:Senaru Village- Sembalun Village (1.150.m) – Sembalun Crater Rim(2.639.m)
    Wake up at 6.00am and get breakfast at 6.30-40 and our special mountain car will ready to bring us to Sembalun village for 45minute /1 hour ,arrive here approx 8.00am then Registration in Rinjani Information Center (RIC) 1051 m and start the trek to Pos 1 (Pemantauan) 1300 m, walking time is about 2 hours. We take a rest for 5/10 minute at Pos 1 ( Pemantauan,) and then continue to Pos 2 (Tengengean) 1500 m walking time about 1 hour. We take short break here for 5 to 10 minutes at Pos 2 ( Tengengean ), and then we continue our journey to Pos 3 (Pada Balong ) 1800 m, walking time is approx 1 hour. We rest for 2 hours at Pos 3, then your guide and porters prepare for lunch, and a hot drink (tea, coffee, hot chocolate or lemon tea). After lunch and a rest, we continue to heading Sembalun Crater Rim (Pelawangan Sembalun) 2639M, walking time 3 hours including a prolonged steep climb. We will camp the night at Sembalun Crater Rim, then from here we can enjoy the awesome views. As the sun sets, and sunrise for the next morning , Segara Anak lake, Sembalun village, the summit of mount Rinjani half of Nort Lombok can be seen from here.

    Day 02: Sembalun Crater Rim(2.639m) – Summit/Top 3.726m – Segara Anak Lake and Hot springs (2008m).
    We wake up at 02:30 am and have some light breakfast then leave at 03:00 am we start the trek to heading Rinjani Summit (3726 m). Walking time approximate 3 hours and 20 minutes. The first stage is a moderate climb for 120 minutes, while the second stage is a fairly easy but long trek. The last hour is very steep and difficult. (There are many loose stones, and as you take two steps forward you will slip one step back). From the Summit, you can see all of Lombok island, Bali, Sumbawa and Segara Anak Lake. After sunrise we will go down to the Sembalun crater rim and have a hot breakfast. After breakfast and a rest, we will go down to the lake and hot srpring the trail down is very steep and slippery beware and extra carefully we need 3 hours to get in to the lake and hot spring, the lunch will be provide by the lake and hot spring just 100m walk from the lake then we will explore the lake and swimming bye hot spring soak in and healing your skin as medicine during on the lake fising bye the local people can be arrange here too, camping and sleeping with your own dinner here.

    Day 03: Segara Anak Lake and Hot springs (2008m).-Senaru Crater Rim(2.641m)
    We will leave from the lake after lunch time and go up to the crater Rim of Senaru for 3 hours walking up this route and trail quite top and steep up and stony we need to be carefull and we will reach this point of the place we called second nice views from the summit, where you can enjoy the incredible sunset over the mountain Agung in bali and the smoke trough tout from the hole of the new volcano by the lake camping and enjoying your Dinner here,

    Day 04: Senaru Crater Rim(2.641m) – Senaru Village (601m)
    After breakfast and enjoying the sunrise, and taking the picture with beautiful scenery of the lake we will go down to Senaru village for 4-5 hour back down and including break and lunch on the way between pos2 or pos extra ,then we will arrive at Senaru Rinjani Trekking Centre around 12.30am to 13.00 then our private car will bring to your next destination as (Gilis island, Senggigi, Mataram or lombok international airport) end of service.

    Thanks a lot, and sorry if I have some errors in english, I’m from Barcelona!

    Kind regards,

    Miriam

    Reply
    • MichaelALanza

      Hi Miriam, thanks for writing. I actually think these boots would be good for your trek. I was referring to the wide lugs not be the best for gripping smooth slabs of steep rock. Wide lugs are good for the kind of hiking on small, loose stones that it sounds like you will encounter. But I always advise people to get fitted by a professional in a store and try on boots and walk around in them to make sure they fit you well before buying. Different brands will will your feet differently. Good luck with your trek, it sounds wonderful. Nice to hear from a reader in Barcelona! I want to visit your city.

      Reply
  3. Avatar

    Sturdy, but incredibly light. I would recommend these boots to any hiker at any skill level. I will be wearing these boots for a long long time.

    Reply

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