Tag Archives: Oregon

December 21, 2015 The Visor on Half Dome, Yosemite National Park.

The Year in 10 Stories at The Big Outside

In Backpacking, Family Adventures, Hiking, National Park Adventures   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   |   2 Comments

By Michael Lanza

At The Big Outside, I post roughly a hundred stories a year of various lengths, from gear reviews and answers to readers’ questions to regular photo galleries—and every few weeks, a feature-length story about an outdoor adventure, many of those with my family. At year’s end, I look back at those longer stories published in the past 12 months and see a pretty darn stellar menu of trip ideas for you, my readers. Here’s a look back, in pictures and brief descriptions, at 10 top stories of 2015 published at The Big Outside. Continue reading →

December 3, 2015 Middle Fork Salmon River, Idaho.

Ask Me: Can You Recommend Rafting Outfitters and Trips?

In Ask Me, Family Adventures, National Park Adventures, Paddling   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   |   2 Comments

Hi Michael,

I just found your blog today after starting my research for a summer guided rafting tour for families. In my next life I’d like to come back as one of your offspring! My husband would like to take our eager son on a guided, overnight rafting trip this summer to celebrate his 10th birthday: father-son trip, but someone else does the heavy lifting so dad and son can focus on enjoyment of the river, campfires and overall one-on-one time. We live in the Bay Area but our son is keen to travel for this trip—Idaho, Utah, Oregon, or Colorado, to name a few suggestions. Can you point us toward some well-regarded guiding companies and provide any insight to consider when we comparison shop?

Kind regards,
Catherine
Lafayette, CA

Continue reading →

November 2, 2015 Hikers on the Chesler Park Trail, Needles District, Canyonlands National Park, Utah.

5 Great Adventures to Take in 2016

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By Michael Lanza

Where will you take a big outdoor adventure in 2016? Do you have any plans on the calendar already? Yes, I know it’s only November, it’s dark and cold outside and next year’s trips seem a long way off. But it’s not at all too early to get the trip-planning wheels in motion; in fact, if you’re thinking about a backcountry trip in a popular national park like The Needles District of Canyonlands or the Grand Canyon next spring or Yosemite next summer, the time to apply for a backcountry permit is coming up fast. Continue reading →

August 24, 2015 Mirror Lake, Lakes Basin, Eagle Cap Wilderness, Oregon.

Photo Gallery: Backpacking Oregon’s Eagle Cap Wilderness

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By Michael Lanza

Forget for a moment where you are while hiking in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, and you might look around and mistake the sharply angled, granite peaks and crystal-clear lakes for the High Sierra. But in the Eagle Cap, which occupies a big chunk of the Wallowa Mountains of northeastern Oregon, you won’t find the Sierra’s crowds (except in a few, popular corners like the Lakes Basin on nice summer weekends) or competition for backcountry permits. As you’ll see in this photo gallery, it’s well worth carving out a long weekend or a week in summer or early fall to explore this place with a backpack. Continue reading →

August 3, 2015 Gnarl Ridge, Timberline Trail, Mount Hood, Oregon.

Full of Surprises: Backpacking Mount Hood’s Timberline Trail

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By Michael Lanza

Minutes after we walk past the sign warning that this section of the Timberline Trail is closed due to “a deep chasm,” with 100-foot drop-offs, created by flooding from a storm—rendering the creek crossing ahead of us “very unstable and unsafe”—Jeff and I reach the top of the ridge high above the east bank of Eliot Creek. If you’ve ever wondered about the destructive power of water, take a look at Eliot Creek. A few steps ahead of us, the trail disappears as if bitten off by a set of jaws about 300 feet wide. The slope below is a torn-up debris field of rocks and crumbling earth. At its bottom, Eliot Creek, the foaming, white-and-gray spawn of Mount Hood’s Eliot Glacier, spits and rages loudly as it courses downhill, like an angry young man spoiling for a fight. Continue reading →

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