A hiker on Bondcliff, on the Pemi Loop in the White Mountains, N.H.

Being Stupid With Friends: A 32-Mile Dayhike in the White Mountains

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By Michael Lanza

As we near the top of Mount Flume in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, the first of nine summits we hope to reach today, a light shower begins falling. It seems a less-than-ideal portent near the front end of one of the longest and hardest days of hiking any of us has ever undertaken—especially for three people somewhere between two and three decades past their hiking prime. But this only strikes us as one more in a long list of reasons to laugh at the absurdity of our self-imposed mission: to see whether we still have the stuff to knock off a dayhike that few mountain walkers would even contemplate.

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One Response to Being Stupid With Friends: A 32-Mile Dayhike in the White Mountains

  1. Jeff Johanson   |  August 22, 2017 at 1:38 pm

    Always enjoy reading about your adventures in the White Mountains since this my home stomping ground. I didn’t start hiking until 6 years ago at age 54 when I met my now fiancé who was a AMC hike, bike, and ski leader. Fell in love with hiking instantly and particularly long, tough day hikes. Thankfully I’ve always been very outdoor active and in good shape. Did my first single day Pemi Loop last year at 59 and again this year at 60 along with another 62YO. I will again do it this month (Aug. 2017) weather permitting with my fiancé who is just about to turn 59. This will be her first Pemi Loop despite years of hiking in the Whites. She will carry only her hydration and I will carry all other supplies. Hopefully this will help her to move a bit more quickly and become less tired over what I predict will be a 17 hour day. I guess where I’m going with this is the many references to age in your article and to many Americans how they develop the “I can’t do that ” attitude. A sedentary life style actually takes a higher more destructive toll on the body vs a highly active life style. Yes, you are gonna be sore, it just comes with the territory but get out there and dream big and bigger.
    Just so you know the Pemi has a sort of cult following for running the loop. Wrap your head around this….the FKT (fastest known time) for running the loop is 6 hours and 10 minutes. If you’ve hiked the loop you’ll understand what a staggering time that is. Almost hard to believe considering the terrain.

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