Review: Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody and Jacket

Ultralight Insulated Jacket
Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody
$329, 9 oz./255g (men’s medium)
Patagonia Micro Puff Jacket
$279, 8.7 oz./247g (men’s medium)
Sizes: men’s XS-3XL, women’s XXS-XXL
backcountry.com

Since getting my Micro Puff Hoody several years ago—and the latest version of the Micro Puff Jacket recently—I have zipped into one or the other in countless circumstances ranging from wind blowing 30 to over 40 mph while belaying a climbing partner or in camp at Idaho’s City of Rocks; sitting at campsites on cool, windy evenings and mornings while backpacking in the Wind River Range and backpacking on the Grand Canyon’s North Rim; on cold winter days under a shell when skiing downhill in the backcountry; and at kids’ soccer games on blustery autumn and spring days. One of the lightest insulated jackets on the market, the Micro Puff is surprisingly warm and versatile. Here’s why.

The Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody in the Grand Canyon.
The Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody in the Grand Canyon.

The water-resistant, 65g PlumaFill synthetic insulation, made from recycled polyester, doesn’t loft quite like down feathers, but it delivers the warmth-to-weight ratio of high-quality, 800-fill or better down, by essentially mimicking the structure of down in a continuous synthetic material. That gives it the warmth and packability of down, with the warm-when-wet performance of synthetic insulation. The quilted construction, resembling a down jacket, employs minimal stitching—helping minimize weight—to prevent the insulation from migrating.

The hood on the hoody versions of the Micro Puff delivers a noticeable warmth boost that’s surprising, given how light it looks, because of the insulation’s heat-trapping efficiency.

Although not adjustable—again, every element of the design aims to minimize weight—the hood’s elasticized, under-the-helmet design clings snugly around your face, moving with you as you turn your head even with the front zipper partly open.

The elasticized cuffs and hem similarly seal tightly enough to keep drafts out.


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The Patagonia Micro Puff Jacket.
The Patagonia Micro Puff Jacket in Idaho’s City of Rocks National Reserve.

The fit isn’t “athletic” or “slim”—the front of the Micro Puff poofs out slightly, though not excessively, and that does allow space for a midweight layer underneath it. The length extends well below the waist, another warmth-boosting detail that’s nice to find in an insulated jacket this light.

The ultralight 10-denier nylon ripstop Pertex Quantum shell—made from NetPlus 100 percent post-consumer recycled nylon ripstop from recycled fishing nets, which helps reduce ocean plastic pollution—is water-resistant, windproof and treated with a PFC-free DWR (durable water repellent coating that does not contain perfluorinated chemicals).

When I’ve worn the hoody or jacket in on-and-off light rain, letting the shell get damp to see what would happen, the fabric appeared to either keep the insulation dry or prevent it from getting damp enough to affect it: I noticed no compromise in warmth. However, this fabric is as light as you’ll find in a jacket—it will tear more easily than a heavier fabric if you accidentally snag it on a sharp edge. The continuous insulation material may not leak out of a tear as quickly as individual down feathers tend to, but I always take extra care when using any ultralight apparel or gear.

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The two zippered hand pockets warm up cold digits, and the jacket stuffs easily into the left pocket, packing down to a good size for a backpacking pillow. Two inside stuff pockets are big enough for warming or drying cold-weather gloves. While lightweight, the front zipper appears reasonably durable—again, though, a little extra care isn’t a bad idea.

We all want lighter gear—but only when it performs well. Beyond broad differences in amount and type of insulation, which dictates the temperatures and conditions they’re made for, many insulated jackets are similar. The models that break new ground do so in how much warmth they deliver relative to their weight and bulk. That’s what Patagonia has achieved with the Micro Puff Hoody and Jacket.

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The Verdict

Whether you’re a backpacker or climber trying to trim ounces in pack weight, or you simply want one of the lightest, most packable, water-resistant puffy jackets for late spring through early fall, the featherweight Micro Puff Hoody performs with the very best.

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You can support my work on this blog by clicking any of these links to purchase a men’s or women’s Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody at backcountry.com or patagonia.com.

See “The 10 Best Down Jackets” and all reviews of insulated jackets and outdoor apparel at The Big Outside.

NOTE: I tested gear for Backpacker Magazine for 20 years. At The Big Outside, I review only what I consider the best outdoor gear and apparel. See categorized menus of all of my gear reviews at The Big Outside.

—Michael Lanza

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3 thoughts on “Review: Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody and Jacket”

  1. I have 2 micro puffs. Love them! Especially since I moved to South Florida where they come in super handy on cold snaps during the winter. Uber light, perfect over just a tshirt and shorts.

    One thing that would be helpful in all clothing reviews is a quick line or two about care, ie washing and drying instructions. The websites are always confusing and non-specific about specialized pieces. Thanks for your time and care.

    Reply