By Michael Lanza

One of the most immutable truisms about hiking is this: Backpackers, dayhikers, climbers, mountain runners, and others who start using trekking poles almost never hit the trail without them again. No matter how much weight you’re carrying—from an ultralight daypack to a godawful heavy monster backpack—your leg muscles and joints, feet, back, and body will all feel better, thanks to the reduced strain, fatigue, and impact on them when you use poles.

Consider this: I do not know a single experienced dayhiker or backpacker who does not use poles.

This review covers the best trekking poles available today. My picks are based on testing all of them (and many other poles) extensively on backpacking trips, dayhikes, mountain climbs and scrambles, backcountry skiing, and ultra-trail runs and dayhikes—as well as my experience of thousands of trail miles over more than a quarter-century of testing and reviewing gear, for many years as the lead gear reviewer for Backpacker magazine, and now for this blog.


Hi, I’m Michael Lanza, creator of The Big Outside, which has made several top outdoors blog lists. Click here to sign up for my FREE email newsletter. Join The Big Outside to get full access to all of my blog’s stories. Click here to learn how I can help you plan your next trip. Please follow my adventures on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Youtube.


 

Backpackers on Clouds Rest in Yosemite National Park.
Backpackers on Clouds Rest in Yosemite National Park. Click photo to read about this hike.

In the reviews below:

  • The poles are listed in order from lightest to heaviest because weight best distinguishes them in terms of intended uses and will be the key factor influencing your choice.
  • I’ve given every pole an overall score—but keep in mind that, with poles, you should first figure out whether you need ultralight, lightweight, or heavier and sturdier poles, and then compare the scores and details of the models in your chosen category (which is why I list the poles in order of weight, not score).
  • For reasons of comparison and intended uses, I categorize poles under 12 ounces (per pair) as ultralight, poles 12-15 oz. as lightweight, and poles one pound or more as the sturdiest, for hard use.
  • The comparison chart below spotlights key metrics and features of each pole covered here.
  • Each summary review below includes a link to my full review of each pole.

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A backpacker on the Piegan Pass Trail in Glacier National Park.
Jeff Wilhelm backpacking to Piegan Pass in Glacier National Park. Click on photo to read about that trip.

I’m confident you will find at least one model of trekking poles ideal for your style of ambulating on or off-trail—and you’ll usually find the best prices at the links to online gear retailers below. I regularly update this review with new poles that belong on this list.

See also my stories “How to Choose Trekking Poles” and “The 10 Best Expert Tips for Hiking With Trekking Poles.”

Please share your questions, opinions, and experiences with any of these poles or your own favorite model in the comments section at the bottom of the review. I try to respond to all comments.

The chart below compares key metrics and features of each pole covered below, including an overall score. But keep in mind that some models have similar or identical scores even though they are very different; look closely at the scoring categories and specific reviews—and use my expert tips for choosing trekking poles—to determine which poles are best for your purposes. That’s why I list them in order of weight, because that metric most clearly distinguishes the types and best uses of poles.

The Best Trekking Poles

Trekking PoleScorePriceWeight/PairSizesCollapsible/FoldingAdjustabilityPacked Length
Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z88%$17010 oz.Four: 110, 120, 130, and 140cmFoldingNo33cm/13 inches (110cm poles)
Gossamer Gear LT590%$19510 oz.One size, adjustableCollapsible60-130cm60cm/23.5 inches
Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ94%$19011.7-13.6 oz.Three sizes, adjustableFolding95-110cm, 105-125cm, and 120-140cm34-40cm/13.4-15.7 inches
REI Flash Folding Trekking Poles86%$14914 oz.Four: 105, 115, 125, and 135cmFoldingNo39.4cm/15.5 inches (115cm poles)
Leki Micro Vario Carbon Black Series91%$25015 oz.One size, adjustableFolding110-130cm40cm/16 inches
MSR DynaLock Ascent93%$1501 lb. 1 oz.Two sizes, adjustableFolding100-120cm and 120-140cm36.2cm/14.3 inches (100-120cm poles)
Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork90%$1801 lb. 1.5 oz.One size, adjustableCollapsible61-130cm61cm/24 inches
Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork86%$1301 lb. 2 oz.One size, adjustableCollapsible74-140cm73.5cm/29 inches
Montem Ultra Strong83%$601 lb. 3 oz.One size, adjustableCollapsible61-135cm61cm/24 inches

Ultralight Poles

Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z trekking and running poles.
Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z trekking and running poles.

Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z
Score: 88%
Best for: lightweight and ultralight backpackers, ultra-runners and hikers, adventure athletes.
$170, 10 oz./pair (110cm, with trekking baskets)
Four sizes, non-adjustable: 110, 120, 130, and 140cm
backcountry.com

Lighter gear can entail tradeoffs, but these ultralight, non-adjustable folding poles make no large compromise on strength. BD’s Distance Carbon Z endured a mostly off-trail, two-day backpacking trip in Idaho’s White Cloud Mountains, and a second mostly off-trail, roughly 14-mile and 5,000-foot dayhike of 10,470-foot Horstman Peak in Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains, among many other hikes and long trail runs. Quickly deployed to their fixed length (in four sizes), thanks to an internal Kevlar cord, these 100 percent carbon fiber poles have extended EVA foam grips and partly mesh nylon wrist straps. They fold to a tiny 33cm/13 inches (for the 110cm size). But they are non-adjustable, and under rare stresses, carbon will sheer or snap.

See my full review of the Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z Poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking any of these links to buy the Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z poles at backcountry.commoosejaw.com, or rei.com.

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Gossamer Gear LT5 trekking poles.
Gossamer Gear LT5 trekking poles.

Gossamer Gear LT5
Score: 90%
Best for: lightweight and ultralight backpackers and hikers.
$195, 10 oz./pair (without trekking baskets)
One size, adjustable 60-130cm
Gossamergear.com

Weighing (per pair) about as much as a lightweight down jacket—and less than five ounces of water—the minimalist, collapsible LT5 poles stand up to more abuse than they’d receive on many well-maintained trails, as I discovered on a 74-mile backpacking trip through the Grand Canyon—including a 15-mile day traversing most of the rugged Escalante Route. The twist-lock LT5 offer the performance needed by many hikers, backpackers, ultra-runners, and others. The carbon shafts extend to 130cm/51 inches, long enough for all but the tallest hikers, and collapse to a reasonably packable 60cm/23.5 inches. While the twist-lock mechanism doesn’t lock as securely as a lever, they rarely slipped in use.

See my full review of the Gossamer Gear LT5 trekking poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking this link to purchase the Gossamer Gear LT5 trekking poles at gossamergear.com.

Plan your next great backpacking trip in Yosemite, Grand Teton, and other parks using my expert e-guides.

 

Lightweight Poles

Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ poles.
Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ poles.

Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ
Score: 94%
Best for: lightweight and ultralight backpackers, hikers, and runners, and adventure athletes.
$190, 12.7 oz./pair (105-125cm, with trekking baskets)
Three sizes, adjustable: 95-110cm, 105-125cm, and 120-140cm
backcountry.com

BD’s folding, 100 percent carbon fiber Distance Carbon FLZ fall on the cusp between the most ultralight and packable poles and models that are only marginally heavier and less packable—a nominal tradeoff for the versatility gained through their adjustability. On hikes and runs on local trails, I found they carry and swing very much like the Distance Carbon Z. Quickly deployed thanks to an internal Kevlar cord, and adjusted using BD’s reliable FlickLock levers, they have extended EVA foam grips and partly mesh nylon wrist straps. They are tough enough for backpacking—although, under rare stresses, carbon will sheer or snap. If you’re looking for the lightest and most packable adjustable poles, you need look no further.

Watch for my upcoming full review of the Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ trekking and running poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking any of these links to buy the Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ poles at backcountry.commoosejaw.com, blackdiamondequipment.com, or rei.com.

Hike stronger and smarter using “The 10 Best Expert Tips for Hiking With Trekking Poles.”

 

REI Flash Folding Trekking Poles.
REI Flash Folding Trekking Poles.

REI Flash Folding Trekking Poles
Score: 86%
Best for: lightweight and ultralight backpackers, ultra-runners and hikers, and adventure athletes.
$149, 14 oz./pair (115cm, with trekking baskets)
Four sizes, non-adjustable: 105, 115, 125 and 135cm
rei.com

When I brought these non-adjustable, folding poles and another, collapsible pair—that are virtually the same weight—on a 12-mile trail run-hike, swapping poles with a partner, it quickly became clear that we both preferred these. A middleweight that’s among the most packable models, when folded they measure just 37-46cm/14.5-18 ins. (depending on the size; 39.4cm/15.5 inches for the 115cm poles), fitting unobtrusively on the outside of a small daypack or a running vest. The carbon shafts lock solidly into place. The EVA foam grips and straps are slightly wider than on the Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z, and the grips extend farther down the shaft—but the REI Flash are also nearly four ounces heavier.

Watch for my upcoming full review of the REI Flash Folding Trekking Poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking this link to buy the REI Flash Folding Trekking Poles at rei.com.

For inexpensive, adjustable, carbon poles, get the REI Flash Carbon Trekking Poles.

Leki Micro Vario Carbon Black Series trekking poles.
Leki Micro Vario Carbon Black Series trekking poles.

Leki Micro Vario Carbon Black Series
Score: 91%
Best for: many backpackers, hikers, and climbers.
$250, 15 oz./pair (with trekking baskets)
One size, adjustable 110-130cm
moosejaw.com

These sticks have a rare combination of qualities ideal for many hikers, backpackers, and climbers: a very packable, folding design, 100 percent carbon construction, and adjustability in a range suitable for most people: from 110cm to 130cm. One of the most compact models on the market, the poles fold to just 40cm/16 inches, fitting easily on a daypack or inside almost any luggage, even carry-ons. Testing them on various hikes, including a three-day, 36-mile backpacking trip on the Teton Crest Trail and a steep, eight-mile, 5,200-vertical-foot dayhike of Idaho’s 12,662-foot Borah Peak, I found these poles strong and easy on the hands, thanks to the anatomical Aergon Thermo Long Grips—which extend down the shaft.

See my full review of the Leki Micro Vario Carbon Black Series trekking poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking either of these links to purchase the Leki Micro Vario Carbon Black Series trekking poles at backcountry.com or Moosejaw.com.

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Sturdiest Poles

MSR DynaLock Ascent Trekking Poles.
MSR DynaLock Ascent trekking poles.

MSR DynaLock Ascent
Score: 93%
Best for: many backpackers, hikers, and climbers.
$150, 1 lb. 1 oz. (100-120cm, with trekking baskets)
Two sizes, adjustable: S (100-120cm), L (120-140cm)
moosejaw.com

These folding poles occupy a unique niche among trekking poles for three qualities: durability, exceptional packability, and having adjustability in folding poles. In the backcountry, they stand out for being tough and stable, proving their value on outings from a 20-mile, mostly off-trail peaks traverse in Idaho’s Sawtooths to a rim-to-rim dayhike across the Grand Canyon and some of the hardest miles on the Appalachian Trail. They have Kevlar-reinforced, all-carbon construction, an adjustability range of 20cm in each of two sizes—serving virtually everyone—and a packed length of a mere 36.2cm/14.3 inches (for the small size). The sections lock rigidly with a simple pin and the Dynalock levers never slipped. And that price is a super value.

See my full review of the MSR Dynalock Ascent trekking poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking any of these links to purchase the MSR Dynalock Ascent Trekking Poles at moosejaw.comrei.com or campsaver.com, or purchase the Dynalock Trail.

Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork four-season trekking poles.
Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork four-season trekking poles.

Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork
Score: 90%
Best for: many backpackers, hikers, climbers, and snow sports users.
$180, 1 lb. 1.5 oz./pair (with trekking baskets)
One size, adjustable 61-130cm
backcountry.com

From a 94-mile traverse of Glacier National Park and a rugged, 74-mile hike in the Grand Canyon to backcountry skiing and scrambling off-trail up mountains, BD’s collapsible Alpine Carbon Cork poles proved tough enough for any activity year-round. The 100 percent carbon shafts have extended grips and feel reasonably light. Adjustable from 110-130cm, they can effectively be used at any length nearly down to their packed length of 61cm/24 inches—a wider range than most poles, serving all but very tall hikers. The FlickLock Pro levers are basically flawless. One major gripe: adjusting the lever tension requires a tiny Allen wrench, rather than a screwdriver head that would be found on many multi-tools or knives.

See my full review of the Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork trekking poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by by clicking any of these links to purchase the Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork trekking poles at backcountry.com, Moosejaw.com, ems.com, blackdiamondequipment.com, or rei.com.

Get the right pack for you. See my picks for “The 10 Best Backpacking Packs” 

and the best ultralight backpacks.

 

Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork trekking poles.
Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork trekking poles.

Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork
Score: 86%
Best for: many backpackers, hikers, climbers, and snow sports users.
$130, 1 lb. 2 oz./pair (with trekking baskets)
One size, adjustable 74-140cm
backcountry.com

Testing these collapsible poles on trails in Idaho, New England, and Glacier National Park, I found their most unique feature, the 15-degree forward angle of the grips, naturally places the pole tips behind my feet, where they deliver the most power. I like that. The FlickLock levers are reliable and the aluminum shafts a bit heavy but highly durable. The cork grips don’t feel greasy with sweaty hands and the foam extensions on the shaft are useful on steep uphills when climbing or backcountry skiing. Perhaps best of all, the huge adjustability range of 74-140cm/29-55 inches exceeds most trekking poles—but so does the collapsed length of 73.5cm/29 inches. Lastly, that’s a good price for sturdy, versatile poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking any of these links to purchase the Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork trekking poles at backcountry.comMoosejaw.com or rei.com, or another model in BD’s Trail series at Moosejaw.com or rei.com.

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The Montem Ultra Strong Trekking Poles.
The Montem Ultra Strong Trekking Poles.

Montem Ultra Strong
Score: 83%
Best for: many backpackers and hikers on a budget.
$60, 1 lb. 3 oz. (with trekking baskets)
One size, adjustable 61-135cm
montemlife.com

If cost is the barrier to you hiking with trekking poles, these collapsible sticks are your answer. On the rugged, 25-mile Thunder River-Deer Creek Loop in the Grand Canyon and a four-day hike in Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains, Montem’s 7075 aluminum shafts suffered no damage. The broad range of adjustability—61-135cm/24-53 inches—bests many poles costing more than twice as much. As with more-expensive models, these have flick-lock levers; soft, EVA foam grips that extend down the shafts; and adjustable hand straps. Tradeoffs: The levers occasionally slipped—although typically in rugged terrain, not on moderate trails—the poles are heavy, and the collapsed length of 61cm/24 inches ranks them among the least-packable models.

See my full review of the Montem Ultra Strong trekking poles.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking any of this link to purchase the Montem Ultra Strong trekking poles at montemlife.com.

See all of my reviews of trekking poles, my “10 Best Expert Tips for Hiking With Trekking Poles,” and all of my reviews of backpacking gear and hiking gear.

Want to make your pack lighter and all of your backpacking trips more enjoyable? See my “10 Tricks for Making Hiking and Backpacking Easier” and “A Practical Guide to Lightweight and Ultralight Backpacking.” If you don’t have a paid subscription to The Big Outside, you can read part of both stories for free, or download the e-guide versions of the 10 tricks here and the lightweight backpacking guide here without having a paid membership.

NOTE: I tested gear for Backpacker Magazine for 20 years. At The Big Outside, I review only what I consider the best outdoor gear and apparel. See categorized menus of all my gear reviews at The Big Outside.

 

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