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Gear Review: Sea to Summit X-Pot Set 31

Sea to Summit X-Pot

Sea to Summit X-Pot

Collapsible Cook Set
Sea to Summit X-Pot Set 31
$110, 1 lb. 6 oz.
Set includes a 2.8L X-Pot with lid, two X-Bowls, two X-Mugs, all collapsible
moosejaw.com

At Helmet Falls camp on the first night of a four-day, 34-mile, family backpacking trip on the Rockwall Trail in Kootenay National Park in the Canadian Rockies, a group of backpackers cooking near us looked at my X-Pot set and one asked, “What is that and who makes it?” When I answered him, he responded, “I gotta get one of those. Or I’m going to watch which bear locker you put your food and cooking gear in later and take it.” I was pretty sure he was kidding—but not entirely certain. The collapsible X-Pot cooking set is sure to change the way we think about cooking systems for backpacking, and many backpackers will covet it.

Sea to Summit X-Set 31 packed.

Sea to Summit X-Set 31 packed.

The key feature is the collapsible, heat-resistant, food-grade silicone walls that lock in place on the 2.8L/3-quart pot, which has a 6063-T6, hardened alloy aluminum base. My family boiled water, cooked pasta, soups, mac ‘n’ cheese and other messy dinners that we found easy to clean from the pot’s bottom and walls, and pouring hot water from the pot was a breeze, with no spills. Both of the 0.7L/22-oz. X-Bowls and 0.5L/16-oz. X-Mugs in this set have collapsible sides, allowing them to nest inside the X-Pot. The clear, plastic pot lid has a strainer for pouring out hot water, and the flexible handles on the pot lock onto the lid when the entire set is collapsed, keeping it closed up for storage and eliminating the need for a pot gripper. When stored, the complete set measures a mere 21.3cm/8.4 inches in diameter and 3.8cm/1.5 inches tall. It’s like a full cook set for two people packs down to the size of less than half a cook set. (My family of four supplemented this set with a couple more mugs.)

 

Hi, I’m Michael Lanza, creator of The Big Outside, which has made several top outdoors blog lists. Click here to sign up for my FREE email newsletter, or enter your email address in the box in the left sidebar or at the bottom of this story. Click here to get full access to all of my blog’s stories. Follow my adventures on Facebook, TwitterInstagram, and Youtube.

 

Sea to Summit X-Bowls and X-Mugs, assembled and collapsed.

Sea to Summit X-Bowls and X-Mugs, assembled and collapsed.

The X-Mugs are marked on the inside for measuring in cups and milliliters and the X-Bowls are marked in milliliters. To avoid damaging the pot’s walls by exposing them to direct flame, or damaging the lid, use the X-Pot only on camp stoves, not in a campfire or on any stove that has a burner wider than the X-Pot’s base (such as a kitchen stove), and not in an oven (such as a Dutch oven). Sea to Summit also warns against putting the set in a dishwasher or using the scouring side of a sponge when cleaning it by hand.

File this under brilliant. While not the lightest cooking system out there, the X-Pot and its accessories change the game when it comes to fitting your cooking system inside your pack—showing us that a cook set doesn’t have to be bulky. Sea to Summit’s X-Pot also comes in 1.4-liter and 4-liter sizes, and various X-Sets, a 1.3-liter X-Kettle and a 20.3cm/8-inch X-Pan are available.

BUY IT NOW You can support my work on this blog by clicking either of these links to buy the Sea to Summit X-Pot Set 31 or other X-Pot sets at moosejaw.com or rei.com.

 

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NOTE: I’ve been testing gear for Backpacker Magazine for 20 years. At The Big Outside, I review only what I consider the best outdoor gear and apparel. See all of my reviews by clicking on the Gear Reviews category at left or in the main menu.

—Michael Lanza

 

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About The Author

Michael Lanza

A former field editor for Backpacker Magazine, Michael Lanza created The Big Outside to share stories and images from his many backpacking, hiking, and other outdoor adventures, as well as expert tips and gear reviews to help readers plan and pull off their own great adventures.

4 Comments

  1. ferdinand

    What would you take with you if you only have to boil water for expedition food: this one, or a lightweight, for example titanium, pot?

    Reply
  2. Carl Gandolfo

    What a great little camp set!! Thanks for posting this, Mike!!

    Reply

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Hi, I'm Michael Lanza, creator of The Big Outside and former Northwest Editor at Backpacker magazine. Click my photo to learn more about me and my blog. Sign up for my free email newsletter in the blue box above. Click on Subscribe Now! in the main menu (top right) to get full access to all of my stories on America's best backpacking, hiking, and outdoor adventures. And click on Ask Me in the main menu to learn how I can help you plan your next trip.

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