Tag Archives: three-season tent reviews

November 26, 2017 A backpacker at Park Creek Pass, North Cascades National Park.

The Best New Hiking and Backpacking Gear of 2017

In Gear Reviews   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   |   2 Comments

By Michael Lanza

Every year, I field test a lot of new gear and clothing for three-season hiking, backpacking, climbing, and winter backcountry activities. Much of it’s pretty good. But to be honest, only a small number rise to the level of excellent, either for technical innovation or simply coming at a task from a new angle that makes their performance superior to others. On those rare occasions, gear can actually make the experiences we seek better in some small way. For this article, I’ve picked out the best pieces of new outdoors gear and apparel that came out in 2017. Continue reading →

Gear Review: The 5 Best Backpacking Tents of 2017

November 21, 2017  |  In Gear Reviews   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   |   5 Comments
The Marmot Tungsten UL 2P in Titcomb Basin, Wind River Range, Wyoming.

The Marmot Tungsten UL 2P in Titcomb Basin, Wind River Range, Wyoming.

By Michael Lanza

Time for a new backpacking tent? There’s hardly been a better time to get one. Whether you prioritize weight, living space, performance in foul weather, or unique features, tents for backpacking have seen great innovation and variety. Designers have thrown out ingrained notions of what a backpacking tent is, making shelters that keep getting lighter, stronger, and in many ways more livable.

For this article, I’ve picked out the five top-performing backpacking tents I’ve field tested and reviewed at this blog. I think you’ll find at least one that’s perfect for you—plus you’ll find some at great sale prices now (and links to those online retailers below; try them all, prices will vary throughout this season). Continue reading →

November 12, 2017 A campsite by the Colorado River at Hance Rapids, Grand Canyon.

How to Choose the Best Ultralight Backpacking Tent for You

In Backpacking, Gear Reviews, Skills   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,   |   Leave a comment

By Michael Lanza

An ultralight backpacking tent can shave pounds from your total pack weight. But when comparing models, the specs on them can look like a big pot of numeral soup. Besides two clear differences—ultralight tents are lighter and usually cost more—you wonder: What differentiates them from one another? I’ve tested and reviewed scores of tents of all sizes. I love the best ultralight tents, but I’ve used many that had flaws or shortcomings not immediately obvious. In this article, I’ll tell you how to find the three-season, ultralight tent that’s best for you. Continue reading →

Gear Review: Marmot Tungsten UL 2P Backpacking Tent

September 21, 2017  |  In Gear Reviews   |   Tagged , , , , , ,   |   Leave a comment
Testing the Marmot Tungsten UL 2P in Wyoming's Wind River Range.

Testing the Marmot Tungsten UL 2P in Wyoming’s Wind River Range.

Three-Season Tent
Marmot Tungsten UL 2P
$299, 3 lbs. 4 oz.
backcountry.com

Is weight the most important consideration when buying a backpacking tent? If it’s one of the first specs you look at, I suggest you give equal consideration to its space—and especially its space-to-weight ratio. In the interest of finding a tent that offers comfortable living quarters for a friend who’s over six feet tall and I to share on a 39-mile backpacking trip in Wyoming’s Wind River Range—but still comes in at a reasonably low weight—I decided to try out Marmot’s well-priced Tungsten UL 2P. I found that it’s a solidly built and notably spacious shelter for its weight, at a price that’s hard to beat for this quality; but I found some nitpicks with it, too. Continue reading →

Gear Review: Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight 2 Tent

July 5, 2017  |  In Gear Reviews   |   Tagged , , , , , ,   |   Leave a comment
Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight 2.

Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight 2.

Three-Season Tent
Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight 2
$200, 3 lbs. 6 oz.
sierradesigns.com

After it was first introduced in the early 1980s, the Clip Flashlight became an iconic tent among backpackers and bikepackers—you’d see them everywhere, and I used one for years. So when the updated version was introduced this spring, curiosity and a little bit of nostalgia prodded me to try it out—and see how this classic shelter holds up in comparison to modern tents. On high-desert trips from southern Utah to southern Idaho in May and June, the Clip Flashlight held up well through serious wind and rainstorms. While I found faults with some aspects of its design, its strengths—and a good price—make it a backcountry shelter worth considering. Continue reading →

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Grand Canyon Hiker