Tag Archives: Upper Muley Twist Canyon

January 31, 2017 Near Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park.

Ask Me: What Are the Can’t Miss, Uncrowded Hikes in Capitol Reef?

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Hello Michael,

Just skimming some of your stuff on Capitol Reef National Park. My fiancee and I, along with her two girls (age 11 and 12), are planning a family trip to Capitol Reef. The girls are quite athletic. I’d love to take them on dayhikes to some of the less-traveled spots in and around the park. What would you regard as “don’t miss?” We may also bring ropes and harnesses. Thinking of the Stegosaur Canyon trip. Anything else like this with minor rappelling and ropework? I was thinking of calling your guide friend Steve Howe, as well.

Love your blog, Michael. Thanks in advance,

Jeff
Boise, ID Continue reading →

April 8, 2015 Near the Frying Pan Trail, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.

Ask Me: Where Should We Backpack in Capitol Reef National Park?

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Hi Michael,

I am taking a trip in April to Capitol Reef National Park and I’m looking for a cool, three-day, two-night backpacking trip to explore some of that country. My wife and I are very experienced, accomplished backpackers and expert at navigation. Do you have any suggestions?

Thanks,

Ed
Bozeman, MT Continue reading →

October 20, 2012

Plunging Into Solitude: Dayhiking, Slot Canyoneering, and Backpacking in Capitol Reef

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By Michael Lanza

We stand on the rim of an unnamed slot canyon in the backcountry of Utah’s Capitol Reef National Park, in a spot that just a handful of people have seen before us. We’ve arrived here after hiking about two hours uphill on the Navajo Knobs Trail, and then heading off-trail, navigating a circuitous route up steep slickrock and below a sheer-walled fin of white Navajo Sandstone hundreds of feet tall, stabbing into the blue sky. Now I peer down at the narrow, deep, and shadowy crack that we have come to rappel into, and feel a little flush of anxiety. Continue reading →