Tag Archives: backpacking skills

August 12, 2018 A black bear in Olympic National Park.

Ask Me: Should I Hike or Backpack Solo in Bear Country?

In Ask Me, Backpacking, Hiking, National Park Adventures, Skills   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   |   13 Comments

Michael,

Here’s a question I’ve struggled with. Because of the timing of my trips, I often end up hiking and backpacking solo. I enjoy that (and enjoy groups). However, as a result, I’ve had a number of bear and moose encounters that have left me a little uncomfortable, and with a feeling of powerlessness in those situations. I’ve read about bear encounters and technically know what to do (making noise, etc.), but I’ve sometimes exhausted all those tricks and found myself still staring at a bear in my path. What do you recommend I do—especially about hiking solo? Continue reading →

August 5, 2018

8 Pro Tips For Preventing Blisters When Hiking

In Backpacking, Hiking, Skills   |   Tagged , , , ,   |   26 Comments

By Michael Lanza

I deserve to be plagued by blisters. I field test upwards of a dozen models of hiking, backpacking, climbing, mountaineering, and trail-running shoes and boots every year. I’m constantly wearing new footwear right out of the box, often hiking 15 to 30 miles a day—usually without doing anything more than trying them on, almost never allowing for any break-in time. And I almost never get a blister. Best of all, the tricks I use to avoid them are simple enough for anyone to practice. Continue reading →

August 1, 2018 A backpacker hiking the Thunder Creek Trail in North Cascades National Park.

The Fine Art of Stashing a Backpack in the Woods

In Backpacking, Skills   |   Tagged , ,   |   1 Comment

By Michael Lanza

Stashing a backpack in the woods is just what it sounds like. If you’re on a multi-day backpacking trip and want to take a side hike of any significant distance, like to a summit, and then return to the same spot to resume you’re backpacking route, it’s a waste of energy (not to mention entirely pointless) to carry your heavy pack with you. But there are ways to do it wrong, and ways to make sure your pack and everything inside it are still there and not torn apart when you return. Here’s how to do it right. Continue reading →

July 31, 2018 Alex hiking Monitor Ridge, Mt. St. Helens

The 5 Best Tips For Hiking With Young Kids

In Backpacking, Family Adventures, Hiking, National Park Adventures, Skills   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , ,   |   4 Comments

By Michael Lanza

After hiking 1,000 vertical feet uphill on the dusty Upper Yosemite Falls Trail in Yosemite Valley, baking under a thermonuclear Sierra sun, we sat on rocks for a snack and a much-needed break. My seven-year-old daughter, unprompted, blurted out, “I’m tired and hungry!” My nine-year-old son was still fuming over having been woken up earlier than he prefers (which is 11 a.m.) for this hike—although we were broiling in the sun precisely because we didn’t start even earlier, when it was cooler. He groused, “If you’re going to wake me up that early, it’s your fault if I complain.”

It was looking like my plan to hike my kids and my 12-year-old nephew 3,000 feet and nearly four miles uphill to the brink of Upper Yosemite Falls—and then, of course, back down—was on the express bus to the graveyard for dumb ideas from overzealous hiker-dads.

 

Continue reading →

July 26, 2018 Campsite by Royal Arch, Royal Arch Loop, Grand Canyon.

The First 5 Things I Do in Camp When Backpacking

In Backpacking, National Park Adventures, Paddling, Skills   |   Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,   |   5 Comments

By Michael Lanza

I doubt that I had any typical routine when arriving at a campsite on my earliest backpacking trips; like many backpackers, I probably just dropped my pack, shucked off my boots, and kicked back until motivated to move by the urge to eat, drink, get warm, or go to the bathroom. Over the years, though, I’ve developed a routine that I follow almost religiously when I arrive in camp at the end of a day of backpacking. These five simple, quick, almost effortless steps make a world of difference in how good I feel that evening and the next morning, and how well I sleep. Follow them and I think you’ll make your campsite hours—and backpacking trips as a whole—more comfortable. Continue reading →

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Grand Canyon Hiker